The Markets

88E is listed on four markets.

ISIN Number AU00000088E2

AIM

88E is traded on the SETsqx platform

1479170256090

http://www.londonstockexchange.com/companies-and-advisors/aim/aim/aim.htm

http://www.londonstockexchange.com/exchange/prices-and-markets/stocks/summary/company-summary/AU00000088E2GBGBXASQ1.html

http://www.londonstockexchange.com/companies-and-advisors/aim/advisers/aim-notices/aimrulesforcompaniesjan16.pdf

http://www.lseg.com/sites/default/files/content/documents/Further%20improvements%20to%20auctions%20on%20the%20SETSqx%20Trading%20Service.pdf

http://www.londonstockexchange.com/prices-and-markets/prices-help/trade-type.htm

http://www.londonstockexchange.com/products-and-services/technical-library/technical-specifications/glossary-terms.pdf

http://www.londonstockexchange.com/products-and-services/trading-services/setsqx/sets-brochure.pdf

http://www.lseg.com/areas-expertise/our-markets/london-stock-exchange/equities-markets/trading-services/domestic-trading-services/setsqx

small-old-asx-logo.png

http://www.asx.com.au/asx/share-price-research/company/88E

S & P ASX Indices News 10/03/17
http://clients3.weblink.com.au/pdf/88E/01837582.pdf
http://www.asx.com.au/products/capitalisation-indices.htm

Chi-X_Australia.jpg

http://cmsau.chi-x.com/MARKETDATA.aspx

Trading Calendars 2017

http://www.lseg.com/areas-expertise/our-markets/london-stock-exchange/equities-markets/trading-services/business-days

http://www.asx.com.au/about/asx-trading-calendar-2017.htm

http://cmsau.chi-x.com/TRADING/MARKETHOLIDAYS.aspx

Compliance Calendar

http://www.asx.com.au/documents/research/company-reporting-dates-2017.pdf

German Stock Exchanges
http://www.finanznachrichten.de/aktienkurse-boersen/88-energy-limited.htm

Analysis

A commonly used tool among technical stock analysts is the moving average. Moving averages are considered to be lagging indicators that simply take the average price of a stock over a certain period of time. Moving averages can be very useful for identifying peaks and troughs. They may also be used to assist the trader figure out proper support and resistance levels for the stock. Currently, 88 Energy (88E.L) has a 200-day MA of xxx, and a 50-day of xxx.
Presently, the stock has a 14-day RSI of xxx, the 7-day is sitting at xxx, and the 3-day is resting at xxx. The Relative Strength Index (RSI) is one of multiple popular technical indicators created by J. Welles Wilder. Wilder introduced RSI in his book “New Concepts in Technical Trading Systems” which was published in 1978. RSI measures the magnitude and velocity of directional price movements. The data is represented graphically by fluctuating between a value of 0 and 100. The indicator is computed by using the average losses and gains of a stock over a certain time period. RSI can be used to help spot overbought or oversold conditions. An RSI reading over 70 would be considered overbought, and a reading under 30 would indicate oversold conditions. A level of 50 would indicate neutral market momentum.

http://www.londonstockexchange.com/exchange/prices-and-markets/stocks/exchange-insight/technical-analysis.html?fourWayKey=AU00000088E2GBGBXASQ1

http://www.asx.com.au/prices/charting-library.htm

A Background to the Market and Market Makers
A Market Maker runs a 'shop' and you buy shares from him or sell them back to him.

The Market Makers act as retailers of shares and display their prices during working hours. The prices may vary (sometimes considerably) during the day, depending on a number of influences. For example, if holders of very large amounts of a share decide to sell (or a combination of a lot of holders of small amounts), then the Market Makers will reduce the price that they are prepared to pay for the share. The converse is true also; if there is a consistent and large enough demand for a share, then the Market Makers will increase the price. Market Makers make money from buying shares at a lower price to which they sell them. This is the bid/offer spread. The more actively a share is traded the more money a Market Maker makes.

It is often felt that the Market Makers manipulate the prices. "Market Manipulation" is an emotive term, and conjurers images of shady deals and exploitation. Market Makers are not elusive companies that appear then vanish overnight. Market Makers are duty bound to make a market and to meet the needs of those they are responsible, to this end they may try to influence the market.

Market Makers are however known to lower prices to "panic" investors into selling, sometimes called "shaking the tree"? Moving the price up, encourages sells, moving it down also encourage sell, hence also the term dead cat bounce when a Market Maker will mark a falling stock up to encourage buyers in thinking they have reached the bottom.

A good pricing system such as Level 2 will give you an indication which Market Makers are keenly priced. Your broker using the same systems as you now have can sometimes get a better price than those on the screen. This is because Market Makers compete with one another for business. When your broker calls the Market Maker he is giving them the opportunity to 'bid' for the business, the Market Maker may well improve on the price on offer via the screens. The Market Maker only makes money when they are buying and selling, so the Market Maker will prefer to see the business go through their books at a reduce margin than allow it to go to another Market Maker.

When you buy and sell shares in most circumstances (SEAQ/AIM) your broker has to go through a Market Maker. The Market Maker works for an institution that makes a market (will buy and sell) that particular stock. They provide the market with liquidity - i.e. there will always be a price you can sell your stock at, there will always be a price you can buy some stock at (unless the share is suspended).

Market Makers obviously have a degree of risk. If there is a flood of sellers, because the Market Maker's job is to provide liquidity, he has to buy those shares even though the rest of the market may want to sell. If the price continues to fall he could be left with a lot of stock on his hands that he paid considerably higher prices for than he can sell for now. And vice versa - if a share is rising sharply the Market Maker has to continue selling the stock to the buyers - he could end up "short" of stock. In this situation he has sold stock he has not got, to fulfill all the buy requests, and he has to buy this stock in to balance his books, but at higher prices and makes a loss.

The Market Makers are effectively in competition with each other. With the example of IMG above, why would a seller want to sell shares to UBSW at 380, when the seller can deal with MLSB or AITK and receive 385p per shares? If UBSW wants to purchase shares, the Market Maker has to raise its bid price. If Market Makers want to buy shares because they may think the stock is heading up or they are short of stock they have to raise their bid price if theirs is not the best bid on the screen. This can cause the spread to narrow. If Market Makers are keen to sell stock they may want to lower their offer price to tempt buyers in. If all Market Makers start moving their offer prices lower to tempt in buyers and offload stock, certain traders could view this as negative for the short term. If Market Makers need or want to take in more stock they will raise their bid prices - certain traders again could see this as a sign of a short-term upswing in prices.

If a Market Maker does not want to trade in the stock he is making a market in he may make his bid/ask spread so wide to discourage anyone to trade with him. If all the Market Makers do this the stock can become illiquid temporarily as no trades are going through - buyers do not want to buy, sellers do not want to sell their stock at what they envisage is a poor bid price.

Price Monitoring Extension

This happens on shares all the time and rarely means anything other than mms are still balancing the books.

Here's the definition from another board.

At 4.30 p.m., automatic execution finishes and the market moves into the auction period. The initial auction period runs for five minutes, during which time market participants can place both market and limit orders.

If the demand to buy or sell at the close is sufficient to move the price outside the 5 percent band, then the price monitoring extension period allows time for liquidity providing or opportunistic market participants, such as market makers, to enter orders to balance the market.

Buy or Sell?
"The London Stock Exchange does not disclose whether a trade is a buy or a sell so this data is estimated based on the trade price received and the LSE-quoted mid-price at the point the trade is placed. It should only be considered an indication and not a recommendation.
Trades priced above the mid-price at the time the trade is placed are labelled as a buy; those priced below the mid-price are sells; and those priced close to the mid-price or declared late are labelled ‘N/A’. "

trade types
http://www.londonstockexchange.com/prices-and-markets/prices-help/trade-type.htm

Share Bagger Definition
http://www.investinganswers.com/financial-dictionary/stock-market/10-bagger-1332

Share Shorting - unmoderated 260217

Q.: Why does short selling reduce share prices?

A: To short-sell a share speculators have to borrow the shares in the first place. Once they have done this they need to sell them in the market, and if this is done en-masse it can push the share price of a company down in the short term as there are more sellers than buyers in the market. Hedge funds specialising in short selling may also cause panic in the market by selling lots of shares in a company as other shareholders become worried about the share price plunge. Some companies will blame short sellers for dramatic declines in their stock price. The practice is so controversial that bans on short selling are not unknown and during the last credit crisis in 2008, traders were not allowed to short-sell certain banks and financial institutions
Most borrowers and lenders of shares are institutions, brokers, etc. Mere mortals can borrow indirectly by using Spread Bets or Contracts for Difference. If you go short, you are effectively borrowing shares to sell for money; if you go long, you are effectively borrowing money to buy shares. Depending on the balance between shorts and longs, the company offering these products may choose to cover the risk by borrowing real shares to sell or by investing money to buy real shares.

Suggested Reading :- http://www.investopedia.com/university/shortselling/

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